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The Translation

 

Matthew 1:25 and Colossians 1:24

 

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Before various translations of Matthew 1:25 and Colossians 1:24 are presented, a brief chronology of Biblical translations follows:

100-300 A.D.

Original Greek and Hebrew-Aramaic manuscripts of the New Testament are available.  Many copies circulated among the seven original Churches: Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum,  Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea.

324 A.D.

St. Jerome is born.  (A brief synopsis of the life of St. Jerome appears at the end of this page.)

360-400 A.D.

The "Latin Vulgate Bible" is completed by St. Jerome. It remains the official Vatican translation of the Bible to this day.

1537 A.D.

The Protestant Reformation begins.

1582 A.D.

The English College at Rheims publishes the Rheims translation of the New Testament from the Latin Vulgate Bible.  Adopted for use by the Catholic Church, primarily as a Lectionary.

1609 A.D.

The English College at Douay publishes the Douay translation of the Old Testament from the Latin Vulgate Bible.   It is included in the Lectionary by the Catholic Church.

1611 A.D.

The King James Bible (Authorized) was published by an edict of King James VI of Scotland. Forty-seven translators, organized into six groups translated the Greek and Hebrew manuscripts available to them; into English. The translations began in 1604 at Westminster, Cambridge, and Oxford Colleges.

1752 A.D.

Bishop Richard Challoner, Catholic Bishop of Debra, Vicar Apostolic of the London District, revised both the old-English Rheims New Testament and the old-English Douay Old Testament into the Douay-Rheims Bible, using the English of his time.  Photo-engraved printed copies are used by some of the laity in the Catholic Church to this day.

The Truth About...... Matthew 1:25 and Colossians 1:24........

 If you read your Bible, eventually you, in a spiritual sense, become the words.  Jesus told Nancy Fowler:

"My Words are Life."

That is why the translation is so important.  The below comparisons are presented to reveal the differences in various translations of the Bible, and how they affect the interpretation of, and respect for, the actual truths presented.

An additional study using English, Greek and Latin Bibles is available on this Web site under the heading entitled "YOUR FAITH". The page is "The Immaculate Conception and Other Truths of Mary."

 

Matthew 1:25

Part one is concerned with the interpretation of a single verse in the New Testament, Matthew 1:25.  The verse preceding it says:

             "And Joseph rising up from sleep, did as the

              angel of the Lord had commanded him, and

             took unto him his wife.....  (Mt1:24 Douay-Rheims v.

Matthew, Chapter 1, verse 25 continues below in several translations:

 

25.       "And he knew her not till she brought forth her first born son."

                                                                              (Mt1:25 Douay Rheims v.Tan)

25.       "And knew her not till she had brought forth her firstborn son."

                                                                              (Mt1:25 Authorized King James,1611,v.)

25.      "et    non  cognoscebat    eam   donec    peperit                                          

               "and  not   he knew      her     until        she brought  forth  

               filium suum        primogenitum."

            son     her            first born

                        (Mt1:25,Biblia Sacra Vulgata v., DeutscBibelgesellschaft, Stuttgart)

(Note: The Latin "cognoscebat" describes a cognitive process, future perfect sense, and does not have a sexual connotation.)  [cognosco - to know (perfect tense); to know again, recognize (in certain special senses). Cassell's Latin Dictionary, D.P. Simpson, M.A., MacMillan Publishing Company, New York, NY]

                 

                    "..kai ouk egenwsken authn ews ou eteke ton uion auths"

    "and   not    did know       her         until          she bore the  son     of her,

                         ton Prototokon"

                         the   Firstborn."

                      (Actual transcription; Greek/English-Mt1:25, The Interlinear Greek-English New

                           Testament v., Sovereign Grace Publishers, Layfayette, IN)

 

25.       "and did not know her till she had brought forth her firstborn Son......"

                                                                            (Mt1:25New King James v.)

25.        "and knew her not till she had brought forth a son.........." 

                                                                                              (Mt1:25American Standard v.)

25.       "and knew her not till she had brought forth a son......"  

                                                                                              (Mt1:25 Living Bible v.)

25.       "but knew her not until she had borne a son....."  

                                                                                             (Mt1:25 Revised Standard v.)

25.       "He had no relations with her until she bore a son......"

                                                                                             (Mt1:25 New American Bible v.)

25.        "He did not have sexual relations with her,  until she gave birth to a son....."

                                                                                              (Mt1:25 Simple English v.)

25.       "He had not had intercourse with her when she gave birth to a son....."

                                                                                              (Mt1:25 New Jerusalem Bible v.)

25.       "but had no marital relations with her until she had borne a son...."

                                                                                             (Mt1:25 New  Revised Standard v.)

25.       "and kept her a virgin until she gave birth to a Son......"

                                                                                             (Mt.1:25 New American Standard v.)

 

Colossians 1:24

Part two is concerned with the theology of Christ's suffering and death as reflected in various translations of the Bible.  Read the following quotations carefully and select which translations place an infinite value on the "sufferings of Christ" therefore requiring us to take them up in our own flesh for the sake of the Church.   Then select the translations that suggest that the "sufferings of Christ" as requiring that they need our sufferings to complete them.  Regardless of our interpretation and regardless of our Christian orientation, we must always be ready to suffer for Christ's Church.

 

24.  "Who now rejoice in my sufferings for you, and fill up

that which is behind of the afflictions of Christ in my

flesh for his body's sake, which is the church."

                                                                            (Col.1:24 KJV,Auth)

 24.   "Who now rejoice in my sufferings for you, and fill up

        those things that are wanting of the sufferings of Christ

        in my flesh, for his body, which is the church."

                                                                           (Col. 1:24 DouayRheimsV)

24.   "qui     nunc gaudeo in passionibus pro vobis

        "who  now   rejoice in sufferings   for  you

        et      adimpleo ea                   quae    desunt  

        and  fill up      those (things)  which  are not 

        passionum      Christi       in  carne mea  pro

        of the passion  of Christ  in  flesh   my   for

        corpore eius quod   est ecclesia."

         body     his   which is   the church."

      (Col.1: 24 Biblia Sacra Vulgata v., DeutscBibelgesellschaft, Stuttgart)

24. 

           Osnuncairw entois paqhmasi  mou uper umwn

     "Who now rejoice    in         the sufferings     of me  on behalf of you

        kai  antanaplhru ta  usterhmata twn  qliyiewn

        and   fill up                 the things  lacking   of the afflictions

        tou Cristou  en th sarki  mou  uperm tou swmatos

        of Christ             in the flesh       of me  on behalf    of the body

         autou  o estinh ekklhsia.

         of Him  which    is the   Church."

 

            (Actual transcription; Greek/English-Col.1:24, The Interlinear Greek-English New

           Testament v., Sovereign Grace Publishers, Layfayette, IN)

 

24.  "Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh

        I complete what is lacking in Christ's afflictions for the sake \

        of his body, that is, the church."

                                                              (Col. 1:24 RevisedStandardV)

24.   "I now rejoice in my sufferings for you, and fill up in my flesh

        what is lacking in the afflictions of Christ, for the sake of His body,

        which is the church."

                                                              (Col. 1:24 NewKingJames)

24.   "Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and fill up on my

        part that which is lacking of the afflictions of Christ in my flesh

        for his body's sake, which is the church."

                                                                (Col. 1:24 AmericanStandardV)

24.  "But part of my work is to suffer for you; and I am glad, for I am

        helping to finish up the remainder of Christ's sufferings for his

        body, the Church."

                                                                (Col. 1:24 LivingBible)

24.  "I am happy even though I am now suffering for you. Christ did

        not finish the suffering. I am completing the suffering which

        was left over. I am doing this in my body for Christ's body,

        the community."

                                                                    (Col.1:24 Simple English Bible)

24.   "Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh

        I do my share on behalf of His body (which is the church) in

        filling up that which is lacking in Christ's afflictions."

                                                                    (Col. 1:24 NewAmericanStandard)

24.  "It makes me happy to be suffering for you now, and in my own

        body to make up all the hardships that still have to be undergone

        by Christ for the sake of his body, the Church."

                                                                    (Col. 1:24 NewJerusalemBible)

24.  "Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I

        am filling up what is lacking in the afflictions of Christ on behalf

        of his body, which is the church."

                                                                    (Col. 1:24 NewAmericanBible)

24.   "I am now rejoicing in my sufferings for your sake, and in my

        flesh I am completing what is lacking in Christ's afflictions for

        the sake of his body, that is, the church."

                                                                      (Col. 1:24 NewRevisedStandardV)

A synopsis on the life of St. Jerome:

Catholic and most mainstream non-Catholic Bible scholars agree that St. Jerome provided the first translation of the New Testament from original Greek and Hebrew-Aramaic into Latin.  Greek and Hebrew and Aramaic (the dialect of Hebrew that Jesus spoke) were known to St. Jerome, because they were being spoken in his day. He also translated the Old Testament, but scholars are not totally in agreement about the quality of his work.

       Born at Stridon, a town on the confines of Dalmatia and Pannonia, about the year 340-2; died at Bethlehem, 30 September, 420. He went to Rome, probably about 360, where he was baptized, and became interested in ecclesiastical matters. From Rome he went to Trier, famous for its schools, and there began his theological studies. Later he went to Aquileia, and towards 373 he set out on a journey to the East. He settled first in Antioch, where he heard Apollinaris of Laodicea, one of the first exegetes of that time and not yet separated from the Church. From 374-9 Jerome led an ascetical life in the desert of Chalcis, south-west of Antioch. Ordained priest at Antioch, he went to Constantinople (380-81), where a friendship sprang up between him and St. Gregory of Nazianzus.  From 382 to August 385 he made another sojourn in Rome, not far from Pope Damasus. When the latter died (11 December, 384) his position became a very difficult one. His harsh criticisms had made him bitter enemies, who tried to ruin him. After a few months he was compelled to leave Rome. By way of Antioch and Alexandria he reached Bethlehem, in 386. He settled there in a monastery near a convent founded by two Roman ladies, Paula and Eustochium, who followed him to Palestine. Henceforth he led a life of asceticism and study.

CHRONOLOGY

        A first period extends to his sojourn in Rome (382), a period of preparation. From this period we have the translation of the homilies of Origen on Jeremias, Ezechiel, and Isaias (379-81), and about the same time the translation of the Chronicle of Eusebius; then the "Vita S. Pauli, prima eremitae" (374-379).

       A second period extends from his sojourn in Rome to the beginning of the translation of the Old Testament from the Hebrew (382-390). During this period the exegetical vocation of St. Jerome asserted itself under the influence of Pope Damasus, and took definite shape when the opposition of the ecclesiastics of Rome compelled the caustic Dalmatian to renounce ecclesiastical advancement and retire to Bethlehem. In 384 we have the correction of the Latin version of the Four Gospels; in 385, the Epistles of St. Paul; in 384, a first revision of the Latin Psalms according to the accepted text of the Septuagint (Roman Psalter); in 384, the revision of the Latin version of the Book of Job, after the accepted version of the Septuagint; between 386 and 391 a second revision of the Latin Psalter, this time according to the text of the "Hexapla" of Origen (Gallican Psalter, embodied in the Vulgate). It is doubtful whether he revised the entire version of the Old Testament according to the Greek of the Septuagint. In 382-383 "Altercatio Luciferiani et Orthodoxi" and "De perpetua Virginitate B. Mariae; adversus Helvidium". In 387-388, commentaries on the Epistles to Philemon, to the Galatians, to the Ephesians, to Titus; and in 389-390, on Ecclesiastes.

       Between 390 and 405, St. Jerome gave all his attention to the translation of the Old Testament according to the Hebrew, but this work alternated with many others. Between 390-394 he translated the Books of Samuel and of Kings, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Canticle of Canticles, Esdras, and Paralipomena. In 390 he translated the treatise "De Spiritu Sancto" of Didymus of Alexandria; in 389-90, he drew up his "Quaestiones hebraicae in Genesim" and "De interpretatione nominum hebraicorum." In 391-92 he wrote the "Vita S. Hilarionis", the "Vita Malchi, monachi captivi", and commentaries on Nahum, Micheas, Sophonias, Aggeus, Habacuc. In 392-93, "De viris illustribus", and "Adversus Jovinianum"; in 395, commentaries on Jonas and Abdias; in 398, revision of the remainder of the Latin version of the New Testament, and about that time commentaries on chapters xiii-xxiii of Isaias; in 398, an unfinished work "Contra Joannem Hierosolymitanum"; in 401, "Apologeticum adversus Rufinum"; between 403-406, "Contra Vigilantium"; finally from 398 to 405, completion of the version of the Old Testament according to the Hebrew.

       In the last period of his life, from 405 to 420, St. Jerome took up the series of his commentaries interrupted for seven years. In 406, he commented on Osee, Joel, Amos, Zacharias, Malachias; in 408, on Daniel; from 408 to 410, on the remainder of Isaias; from 410 to 415, on Ezechiel; from 415-420, on Jeremias. From 401 to 410 date what is left of his sermons; treatises on St. Mark, homilies on the Psalms, on various subjects, and on the Gospels; in 415, "Dialogi contra Pelagianos".

       St. Jerome owes his place in the history of exegetical studies chiefly to his revisions and translations of the Bible. Until about 391-2, he considered the Septuagint translation as inspired. But the progress of his Hebraistic studies and his intercourse with the rabbis made him give up that idea, and he recognized as inspired the original text only. It was about this period that he undertook the translation of the Old Testament from the Hebrew. 

(Catholic Encyclopedia/www.newadvent.com)

 

Conclusion

Please investigate the translation before you purchase a new Bible or replace your current one.

 

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